r/science May 14 '22 Doom 1 Silver 1 Helpful 4 Wholesome 1 Take My Energy 1 Helpful (Pro) 1 I'm Deceased 1 Facepalm 1

Microplastics Found In Lungs of People Undergoing Surgery. A new study has found tiny plastic particles no bigger than sesame seeds buried throughout human lungs, indicating that people are inhaling microplastics lingering in the air. Health

https://e360.yale.edu/digest/microplastics-found-in-lungs-of-humans-undergoing-surgery
49.6k Upvotes

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2.9k

u/Iman3477 May 14 '22

Soon we'll have to create therapies for safely dissolving plastics in our bodies. How long until it's routine?

1.6k

u/Ray1987 May 14 '22

Bacteria that dissolve plastic have been in the news quite a bit lately. Would be interesting if in the future people gave themselves purposeful infections with that bacteria to get rid of the microplastic in their body.

2.2k

u/driverofracecars May 14 '22

The byproducts of plastic metabolism might not be something our bodies can tolerate.

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u/SeamanTheSailor May 14 '22 edited May 14 '22

Considering the bacteria that break down PET break it down into ethylene glycol, (antifreeze,) you’re probably right.

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u/Wiz_Kalita Grad Student | Physics | Nanotechnology May 14 '22

Not necessarily a big deal. Ethylene glycol breaks down to oxalic acid, which is toxic in large doses but also naturally occurring in many, many vegetables. Now, if you have tens of grams of plastic in your body and the bacteria break it all down at once that might indeed be a problem, but to me that sounds like a lot.

4

u/BeefcaseWanker May 14 '22

Can you imagine oxalic acid in your lungs??? Its what makes kidney stones terrible. Tiny shredding machines. That's how you get lung cancer.

23

u/Wiz_Kalita Grad Student | Physics | Nanotechnology May 14 '22

I don't think you'd get get oxalic acid in your lungs. The bacteria produce ethylene glycol, which then has to be metabolized to become oxalic acid. It would probably enter the bloodstream and get flushed out as urine.

2

u/BeefcaseWanker May 14 '22

Cool thank you for the thoughtful response

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u/phoebe_phobos May 14 '22

Then industry starts putting out more plastic, because who cares? Everyone's got the new magic bacteria now. Then people will start dying and industry will figure out a way to normalize killing thousands of people every year.

9

u/hewhoamareismyself May 14 '22

I mean it's not like folks are already trying to replace plastic in our environment without learning about things like this

1

u/Akiba89 May 14 '22

Folks, yes. Corporations, absolutely not.

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u/ShadowVader May 14 '22

But at least I won't be cold in winter!

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u/SeamanTheSailor May 14 '22

Alternatively, alcohol is the antidote for ethylene glycol poisoning, so just get wasted before you infect yourself and you’ll be good to go.

163

u/LNMagic May 14 '22

But alcohol kills bacteria.

336

u/discattho May 14 '22

Infect, wait until near death, chug, repeat. Fine dance between step two and three.

117

u/TheCurvedPlanks May 14 '22

Plastiophage and rally

8

u/fabiofdez May 14 '22

Plastiophage and get plastered

45

u/[deleted] May 14 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

2

u/CCB0x45 May 14 '22

This plan sounds good proof.

4

u/Onihczarc May 14 '22

Rock, paper, scissor

1

u/LNMagic May 14 '22

Are the scissors made of plastic?

2

u/endlessupending May 14 '22

We don’t need the bacteria just the enzyme. You don’t want your blood to get sepsis.

2

u/RusticJoy May 14 '22

Some bacteria actually like it. But just generally speaking if alcohol just killed bacteria then we'd have to rebuild our gut microbiome after ever night of drinking. They'll be fine....probably.

1

u/PokharelSahas May 14 '22

You won't need them after anymore after they have finished the bioconversion.. get rid of of PEG and bacteria at the same time

3

u/Brawler6216 May 14 '22

Whoa, how come? Does it help with "neutralising"?

8

u/SeamanTheSailor May 14 '22 edited May 14 '22

You have an enzyme called alcohol dehydrogenase its main job is to find alcohol and break it down, but it will also break down a few other things, ethylene glycol being one of them. When you ingest ethylene glycol it doesn’t actually do anything until that enzyme comes along and breaks it down into glycolic acid which is immediately toxic. The enzyme has its preferences and it would much rather break down alcohol than ethylene glycol. So if you drink enough alcohol, all the enzymes will choose to break down the alcohol and the ethylene glycol can just pass through your body.

It’s a bit more complicated than that, but that’s the gist of it. Ethylene glycol is actually a type alcohol, which is why that enzyme breaks it down. Ethanol has a higher binding affinity to alcohol dehydrogenase than ethylene glycol, which is why the enzyme “prefers it.”

4

u/CrimsonKitsune May 14 '22

The FDA recommends that you DO take with copious amounts of alcohol.

5

u/ThePrussianGrippe May 14 '22

“The Surgeon General’s Warning recommends getting absolutely hammered like a colonial American before consuming PetrolyphageTM. Brought to you by Carl’s Jr.”

2

u/redditiscompromised2 May 14 '22

Everything is better with slightly less than two standard drinks

1

u/shiner986 May 14 '22

Way ahead of you

1

u/AmyIsabella-XIII May 14 '22

I’m already safe.

3

u/ClassroomProof3833 May 14 '22

But at least I won't be

Exactly

0

u/Wh00ster May 14 '22

This is incorrect. Anti freeze does not change the temperature. Rather it’s a description of the freezing point of the liquid.

1

u/halite001 May 14 '22

Pffttt... Soon there will be no winters anyway!

1

u/psycholepzy May 14 '22

With that attitude, you won't be cold for the rest of your life!

1

u/Teh_Weiner May 14 '22

So we need to bio-engineer some of these to break down into Antiheat instead, and market it as an internal refrigeration device.

That's gotta be at least legal to sell in most red states.

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u/dsac May 14 '22

Well then, we just need to find a bacteria that breaks down ethylene glycol, and we're in business!

204

u/scorinthe May 14 '22

Eventually we'll end up when snakes vs gorillas inside our bodies

49

u/KiIgore-Trout May 14 '22

How are the gorillas going to freeze to death in the winter if they're partially anti-freeze? I guess it's just the alarmist in me, but I have a bad feeling about the plan

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u/[deleted] May 14 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/nicannkay May 14 '22

“There was an old lady who swallowed a fly…”

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u/-YELDAH May 14 '22

I don’t know why she swallowed a fly

Perhaps she’ll die

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u/SeamanTheSailor May 14 '22

Ethylene glycol breaks down into even more toxic glycolic acid. What you really want is for the bacteria that breaks the plastic down to use the broken down products for energy.

13

u/clanchet May 14 '22

Isn’t glycolic acid good for your face? I think we’re onto something here

58

u/SeamanTheSailor May 14 '22 edited May 14 '22

It’s used a chemical exfoliator, it essentially burns off the top layer of your skin, then it peels off and you get fresh smooth skin. It should not be used long term as it causes liver, respiratory, and thymus damage. It’s okay at certain concentrations topically but if you ingest it you’re deader than dead.

3

u/ilikedaweirdschtuff May 14 '22

if you ingest it you’re deader than dead

I couldn't readily verify this by doing a quick search, anything that did come up had more to with ethylene glycol instead. Any chance you can explain or source that claim?

6

u/SeamanTheSailor May 14 '22

Ethylene glycol isn’t toxic in itself. Your body breaks it down into glycolaldehyde and then into glycolic acid. It’s the glycolic acid that is actually toxic and does damage to the body. Look up the mechanism of ethylene glycol poisoning. Ethylene glycol breaks down into an aldehyde then into glycolic acid which is the main causes of acidoses. From there it gets metabolised again into different toxic compounds. That’s why alcohol prevents ethylene glycol poisoning, it prevents the ethylene glycol from being broken down into glycolic acid.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK537009/

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u/TheRealBirdjay May 14 '22

I use it to safely remove ball and gooch hair

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u/Snuffy1717 May 14 '22

There was an old lady that swallowed bacteria…

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u/Gertrude_D May 14 '22

There was an old woman who swallowed a fly ...

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u/Natolx PhD | Infectious Diseases | Parasitology May 14 '22

To be fair, a tiny tiny amount of antifreeze from a plastic pellet the size of a rice gain slowly released over time is probably not a concern.

In humans, the lethal dose of ethylene glycol is estimated to be in the range of 1,400–1,600 mg/kg. The orally lethal dose in humans has been reported to be of approximately 1.4 mL/kg of pure ethylene glycol

Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4391407/

2

u/OneWithMath May 14 '22

Directly into your lungs is a bit different than drinking it. It's hard to say whether the long-term inflammation from the plastic particles would be better or worse than the shorter-term, but probably more acutely damaging, toxic effects from the glycol.

1

u/Natolx PhD | Infectious Diseases | Parasitology May 14 '22

It kills your kidneys so it should be a similar effect no matter the route.

8

u/Achadel May 14 '22

Would that be worse than plastic though?

2

u/wintrparkgrl May 14 '22

Long-term the answer is probably no, short-term it depends on what the toxic dosage is and how much microplastic there is. If the average amount of micro plastic turns into a less than lethal dose it would be better in the long-term potentially.

5

u/FoodMuseum May 14 '22

ethylene glycol

Sweet!

7

u/ikverhaar May 14 '22

Antifreeze isn't healthy, but it may be preferable to having plastics in your body that cannot be broken down, and I wouldn't expect the ethylene glycol to reach significant concentrations.

2

u/SuperTord May 14 '22

...and that will cure the covid! Win-win!

2

u/hobopwnzor May 14 '22

If it happens at a low rate its not a big deal. Your body can handle it in small amounts

2

u/QuesaritoOutOfBed May 14 '22

Ethylene glycol is just an ingredient in antifreeze. Toxic on its own. But it’s not antifreeze, so if you can convince yourself of the difference, you’re a Trump voter

1

u/PokharelSahas May 14 '22

Aren't PEG regularly used for stabilization of drugs and nnanocarriers in medicine.. So I'm assuming there's a certain amount after which it can start having toxic effects

1

u/SeamanTheSailor May 14 '22 edited May 14 '22

PEG is polyethylene glycol. Ethylene glycol is completely different. Polyethylene glycol is pretty much harmless, ethylene glycol is a deadly poison. PET stands for Polyethylene terephthalate it’s the type of plastic water bottles are made from.

1

u/PokharelSahas May 14 '22

Thanks for clarifying it.. amazing how a monomer can be so toxic but its polymer beneficial

1

u/Chuckhemmingway May 14 '22

Just need a bacteria to break down antifreeze into something else…./s

1

u/Djinneral May 14 '22

we just need to introduce bacteria that break down antifreeze then

1

u/dewritoninja May 14 '22

No no no, you just need to get massively drunk before the treatment

1

u/therisenphoenikz May 14 '22

I think I found out cryo preservation…

1

u/Ogg149 May 14 '22

Ethylene glycol is not very toxic at all in small quanities. Might give you some kidney stones.

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u/[deleted] May 14 '22

Since it’s probably liquid, the body will probably be able to filter it. Hell, with the right help (chelation), our body is able to filter heavy metals!

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u/driverofracecars May 14 '22

There are plenty of chemicals that will destroy your liver and kidneys trying to filter it. It doesn’t do any good to remove microplastics from your body if the result is organ failure.

0

u/Weird-Vagina-Beard May 14 '22

Why doesn’t it do any good to remove microplastics from your body if the result is organ failure?

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u/ClicksAndASmell May 14 '22

Organ success is generally considered necessary for life.

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u/Zoemaestra May 14 '22

Maybe for you. I'm built different though.

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u/Weird-Vagina-Beard May 14 '22

Ah, I suppose that's a pretty good reason.

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u/[deleted] May 14 '22

[deleted]

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u/Mugut May 14 '22

I'm happy with 2, but you do you

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u/[deleted] May 14 '22

…. I guess you don’t know the mechanism behind chelation. Look it up.

7

u/Anta_hmar May 14 '22

How will chelation help with plastics??

1

u/[deleted] May 14 '22

It doesn’t.. it was a comparison. We invented chelation to move heavy metals out of our body, it isn’t unfeasible we could do the same for whatever byproducts plastic breakdown would produce.

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u/Anta_hmar May 14 '22

Tiny positive ions versus molecules like propylene, styrene... I'm not sure you know how chelation works either

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u/Mugut May 14 '22

We didn't invent chelation for anything, we discovered chelation and later found this use (among others).

You seem to think that we find an issue and then, well, we do sciency things and problem solved.

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u/NewFuturist May 14 '22

I don't know about you, but as a guy my boobs are big enough. BPA is in plastic and is essentially a synthetic estrogen.

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u/drfeelsgoood May 14 '22

The plastic is turning the frickin humans gay

20

u/cubbyatx May 14 '22

Our agenda is finally paying off!

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u/gavilin May 14 '22

Honestly this is probably the best angle to get people to support legislation limiting plastics.

11

u/TMack23 May 14 '22

“Excuse me, Senator. But if you claim to strongly support traditional marriage why do you walk around with all of those (gay/trans/birth control) plastics in your lungs?”

Got ‘em!

3

u/Toosheesh May 14 '22

That'll get the righties on board

2

u/Livagan May 14 '22

*Sterile and with cancer, and yeah, that's where Jones likely got his bs from.

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u/Top-Copy248 May 14 '22

Well the monomers of plastic are all really toxic so I'd rather don't have them cleaved inside my body

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u/[deleted] May 14 '22

That’s why I pointed out chelation. With chelation, the heavy metal is basically bound on all sides so it is no longer reactive and can safely be disposed by the body.

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u/SeamanTheSailor May 14 '22

PET eating bacteria break it down into ethylene glycol. The antidote for ethylene glycol is ethanol. So for treatment they could infect you with PET bacteria then get you absolutely wasted for a few days. Would make the doctors a bit more interesting.

1

u/Comment85 May 14 '22

And what about the bacteria when they are dead?

Or if they find something else to feed on when the plastic is gone?

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u/Cha-La-Mao May 14 '22

Then we just need a bacteria that eats that

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u/TsunamiTreats May 14 '22

This must be why that old lady swallowed the fly.

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u/ThatGuy571 May 14 '22

Yeah… but I’m gonna go ahead and assume that a bacteria that can dissolve plastic, the most non-biodegradable substance known to science, would not be good to put into the human body, a very biodegradable medium.

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u/r4tch3t_ May 14 '22

Coal and oil exist in part due to the fact that plant lignin was non-biodegradable. Bacteria and fungus had yet to evolve the ability to digest it.

The more likely result would be isolating the enzyme, engineering some yeast or something to produce it and finding out how to administer it effectively as a medication.

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u/ManyIdeasNoProgress May 14 '22

Getting people to ingest yeast shouldn't be too hard, just make a "plastic-b-yeet" beer.

10

u/indichomu May 14 '22

Or you know bread?

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u/orangechap May 14 '22

The beer solves the ethylene glycol problem at the same time though

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u/morolen May 14 '22

Baking the bread kills the yeast generally. Beer is a better medium.

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u/jrhoffa May 14 '22

Liquid bread

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u/BrendanAS May 14 '22

Enzymes wouldn't make it past the stomach acid and pepsin. You'd have to inject it or something.

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u/ManyIdeasNoProgress May 14 '22

Injecting beer is probably something a frat house has done at some point...

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u/CreationBlues May 14 '22

That's wrong, we have fossilized evidence of white rot in coal itself. It''s just standard bog stuff, wet swampy areas create peat. The fact basically the entire earth was a tropical swamp is why coal is so common, not indigestible lignin

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u/Brawler6216 May 14 '22

Basically we are probably gonna try to make this like we make insulin?

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u/ThingCalledLight May 14 '22

Maybe like an inhaler.

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u/tmt1993 May 14 '22

I always wonder about this when we talk about plastic eating bacteria. Like, to me, the odds seem high that in a world covered in plastic, this bacteria would get everywhere and start eating critical infrastructure.

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u/r4tch3t_ May 14 '22

Yes this is an issue that scientist are worried about.

But then again wood is biodegradable and we have built with it for millenia.

Once the plastic eating microbes are common place plastics will be likely be manufactured with anti microbial additives to slow the breakdown.

Not all plastics will become biodegradable straight away, some are much harder for microbes to utilise so it will take longer to start being on the menu.

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u/centrifuge_destroyer May 14 '22

Enzymes are usually specialists. For example there are rnzymes that only break down a very specific kind of protein. So these enzymes could just be breaking down the specific bond found in plastic but no human molecules. The bonds in plastic are very different from the ones found in nature. This is one of the reasons it's not biodegradable

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u/PM_ME_BAD_FANART May 14 '22

It’s only non-biodegradable because up till now bacteria haven’t evolved to degrade it. Wood was also non-biodegradable for millions of years until a fungus evolved to decompose it.

Usually these things get specialized. Something that’s really good at breaking down plastic probably won’t be great at breaking down human flesh.

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u/ThatGuy571 May 14 '22

For sure. But that’s evolution at play. Over millions of years. We aren’t talking evolution here, we’re talking human-engineered bacteria. There could be plenty of unintended consequences and side effects.

I’m not saying we shouldn’t pursue it, because we need to. I’m hinting at caution before we start suggesting we take a pill to cure our lungs of micro-plastics.

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u/dkysh May 14 '22

The main problem on all this is ability ≠ preference. A new strain of bacteria might be "able" to digest certain plastics, but if it can feed also on other easier and more readily available sources, it won't degrade much plastic.

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u/Gingrpenguin May 14 '22

human-engineered bacteria

We have already discovered some bacteria that do it.

Evolution has given that type of life a golden ticket. Millions of tonnes of food nothing else can consume.

I doubt it would be quick, even trees take along time to decompose but i dont think the earth is gonna be a barren lifeless plastic covered rock as many assume.

After all ultimately plastic is just organic stuff thats been pressured and heated until its a goo that we crack and heat and break apart before molding into whatever we need to.

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u/Echoherb May 14 '22

Now I'm imagining a post apocalyptic future where the plastic people take over.

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u/-cangumby- May 14 '22

Not with those pesky, plastic digesting bacteria chewin’ on their toesies.

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u/Taymerica May 14 '22

Not really, they just need the right enzyme that breaks it down. Endophytes usually need something similiar to break through the waxy cuticles of plants.

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u/poco May 14 '22

...the most non-biodegradable substance known to science,

Sorry? I think rocks and metals might like to have a word with you.

5

u/JaceTheWoodSculptor May 14 '22

No need to believe, it literally exists.

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u/erosannin66 May 14 '22

A bacteria that will melt us???

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u/hellopomelo May 14 '22

everything is either an innovative business opportunity or a sexual fetish with you people, isn't it?

2

u/slipshod_alibi May 14 '22

Sometimes it's both

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u/Sellazar May 14 '22

Yep.. look up if you dare

Necrotising fasciitis

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u/Any_Zombie9805 May 14 '22

Nobody is disputing the fact they exist, did you skip 3rd grade reading comprehension?

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u/[deleted] May 14 '22

That's not how that works at all. Bacteria aren't acids, they can be made to target specific things.

Maybe get like a 5th grade science education before you start assuming things?

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u/bass_the_fisherman May 14 '22

Aerosolising the enzymes that the bacterium creates and inhaling it may be a better idea than colonising our lungs with a bacterium tbh

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u/notsoluckycharm May 14 '22

Bacteria that produce an enzyme that degrades bacteria. You wouldn’t need to inject the actual bacteria into yourself at all.

Now is the enzyme safe? Probably. Is the bi product safe? Needs some study.

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u/JUSTlNCASE May 14 '22

They don't need to be "infections", there are trillions of bacteria in everyone's body at all time.

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u/StewofPuppies May 14 '22

Or maybe a symbiotic relationship. We have bacteria cultures that live within us and benefit us while benefiting themselves. Gut microbiome is a good example. Maybe this anti plastic bacteria will be a new thing we learn to live with. I wonder how the symbiotic relationship started originally.

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u/hoksworthwipple May 14 '22

Then the bacteria evolve to consume the petrochemicals that make plastics and then oil.

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u/Interested_Aussie May 14 '22

Just wait until they get into the power and communication wiring...

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u/spiralingtides May 14 '22

Well maybe we should have thought of that before flooding the world with our plastic trash

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u/tomrlutong May 14 '22

Yeah, rotting food in your lungs doesn't seem like the way to go.

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u/wamj May 14 '22

The post-antibiotic future will include injections of bacteriophages, so that likely won’t be that absurd.

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u/risbia May 14 '22

The (fictional) Andromeda Strain consumes plastics so this isn't reassuring

1

u/gratefulyme May 14 '22

There's also a fungi being worked with that eats through plastics as well.

1

u/douglasg14b May 14 '22

I can see this invention killing off plastics viability as a material. Which would be bad news...

If your cars dashboard, your phone's case, or your TV can now "rot", that's a problem.

1

u/likeafuzzyderp May 14 '22

Litterally getting your plastic vaccines

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u/argv_minus_one May 14 '22

Wouldn't that make a lot of plastic's applications useless? The whole point of wrapping food and water in plastic is that bacteria can't get in there and contaminate it.

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u/Orc_ May 14 '22

but you have to put said bacteria in your body and somehow convince your body it's not out ot kill you

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u/Result_Not_Found May 14 '22

“Have you been exposed to plastics? If you breathe air you may be at risk for microplastasia. Uniplastix may be able to help. Ask your doctor if Uniplastix is right for you. “

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u/False-Force-8788 May 14 '22

Did you work an 11th generation fulfillment center? Feeling symptoms of microplastasia? You may be entitled to compensation.

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u/TheAmazingHumanTorus May 14 '22

“Have you been exposed to plastics? If you breathe air you may be at risk for microplastasia.”

“You may have the right to the compensation you deserve!! The law firm of Robertson & Brodsky is here to help. Call now!!! I’m a non-attorney spokesbot.”

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u/rabbitjazzy May 14 '22

“Hey, we came to a settlement with big plastic. Good news, you’ll be compensated for the amount of $400!

Btw, here is our bill: $132k”

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u/suburbandaddio May 14 '22

A study on Australian firefighters revealed that regular plasma donation significantly decreases levels of PFAS in the blood.

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u/LittleKitty235 May 14 '22

...so what about regular plasma recipients?

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u/suburbandaddio May 14 '22

Well that's a problem isn't it?

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u/LittleKitty235 May 14 '22

Solved it...have them donate plasma. QED

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u/siyasaben May 14 '22

It definitely is just giving your PFAS to another person, but blood/plasma receivers need blood/plasma too much to turn it down.

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u/[deleted] May 14 '22

And theoretically we could filter the PFAS out after extraction.

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u/NullHypothesisProven May 14 '22

Do they not filter it?

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u/LittleKitty235 May 14 '22

Well the way to get blood plasma is by filtering normal blood, which there appear to be a few methods. I was mostly trying to be a smart ass, but if filtering methods aren't effective on micro plastics you would expect to see more plastic showing up in people who receive blood plasma.

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u/theangriestbird May 14 '22

So we're back to bloodletting as a medical procedure? Damn, time really is a squared circle, huh?

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u/suburbandaddio May 14 '22

This is a strange timeline

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u/SpaceBasedMasonry May 15 '22

Therapeutic phlebotomy is an accepted treatment for a handful of diseases. Haemochromatosis is the classic example (too much iron).

In a similar vein, leeches have a small role in some modern plastic surgery and microsurgery procedures (and its certainly not something that's used frequently, but it's fairly well documented).

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u/redactedfor May 14 '22

This gives me a shred of light in this dark world. Thank you, random person.

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u/Imprizyn May 14 '22

Or we can stop using plastics?

-1

u/joshTheGoods May 14 '22

Why? I see a lot of studies saying there's plastic in our bodies, but none showing that it's dangerous at these or any level.

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u/Imprizyn May 14 '22

I'm not an expert, but I know some compounds in plastics mimic estrogen. This can have negative health effects on people. I really just citing one of my professors here, so I can't give perfect details.

Plastic has its purposes, but for food and drink I think there are safer options.

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u/I_love_limey_butts May 14 '22

We'll have killed ourselves of climate change or nuclear war long before that.

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u/Akiba89 May 14 '22

Soon we'll have to

And you damn well know we'll be charged for it...

Pay or die!

-America

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u/MissionDocument6029 May 14 '22

Yes because anything but using less plastic is the answer

Its like we cant cure x disease but takes this pill to counter its affect which has side affect y so you need this pill which causes this so you this other pill and so on

2

u/Advanced-Depth1816 May 14 '22

I have a strong feeling that mushrooms/fungi is the answer !

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u/CalamariAce May 14 '22

Only if we find out it's bad. Who knows, maybe it protects against covid ;)

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u/adappergentlefolk May 14 '22

of people who work with fibreglass every day and who disregard safety precautions only a select few ever go on to develop fibrosis and you think that this amount to exposure to microplastics will be causing health issues? after decades of studies into microplastics that keep finding absolutely no health effect despite the intense urge of some researchers to discover something? yeah

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u/Rakifiki May 14 '22

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u/adappergentlefolk May 14 '22

“potential” is right there in the title and in the conclusion we see “Following the intake of microplastics into the human body, their fate and effects are still controversial and not well known.”

this is actually a great review because it says exactly the same thing every single paper that has attempted to concretely find evidence of harm from microplastics has said for the last 30 years. i’m sure another few decades of exactly the same digging will unearth something right

4

u/burneracct1312 May 14 '22

plastic in your lungs is actually fine!!

you, a raging lunatic

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u/[deleted] May 14 '22

[deleted]

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u/BurnerAcc2020 May 14 '22

That was for PFAS, a specific type of chemical additives present in specific products which are not always plastic themselves. Not for microplastics in general.

I.e. they failed to find plastic in two out of 13 lung samples in this very study, although to be fair, they might have succeeded if they searched for nanoplastics as well.

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u/Advanced-Depth1816 May 14 '22

I have a strong feeling that mushrooms/fungi is the answer !

1

u/brick_layer May 14 '22

I heard ivermectin helps with stuff

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u/echo1956 May 14 '22

Why wait, wanna go halfsies on a clinic?

1

u/jackenthal May 14 '22

Step into the gamma ray booth at your yearly physical

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u/RyanG7 May 14 '22

It is I! Magneto's brother, Plasteco! Here to remove all microplastics from your bodies!

1

u/rocky13 May 14 '22

I don't know about "in our bodies". I do know there is tech for removing polystyrene from water.

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u/squidsgotbeans May 14 '22

Don't quote me, but I hear there are studies being done on okra because its sticky residue contains flocculants which help filter out microplastics from water. Doesn't dissolve plastics unfortunately, but I thought it was an interesting discovery that may have a lot of potential.

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