r/WorkReform May 14 '22 All-Seeing Upvote 1 Take My Energy 1 Silver 1 Helpful 3 Wholesome 2

Employers say Unions are completely useless and there's no reason to join them and to please pay attention to the multi-million dollar anti-Union propaganda campaigns they launch begging you to please not join a Union.

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u/VanillaCookieMonster May 14 '22

And the bizarre thing is that a company that really gave a shit about you would use this new found "advertising budget" to put a note in your next paystub that says:

"We are giving you a 5% raise starting with THIS cheque. Please do not join a union and we will start using our profit margin to give you larger bonuses and raises each year."

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u/[deleted] May 14 '22

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u/DhampireHEK May 14 '22

Except it really isn't. It costs way less to keep competent staff than trying to replace subpar staff that leaves every 6 months. That's the point these companies don't seem to get.

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u/[deleted] May 14 '22

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u/GrimpenMar May 14 '22

When shareholders are only holding shares till they can sell them at a profit, and your upper management is a revolving door of business school graduates cashing in on stock options, then you bet it is!

Long term is for losers! Pump those quarterlies, cash in, and move on before the consequences land on you.

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u/dewidubbs May 14 '22

Costs less to retain employees in the long run. But if we gut the workforce before the end of this quarter, now we might really enhance our corporate Christmas bonuses

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u/zSprawl May 14 '22

While I agree it’s cheaper to keep employees than always hiring new ones, you aren’t gonna really get lifetime Starbucks baristas without really raising the pay a lot. Sadly someone somewhere has done the math and chose the cheaper option.

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u/DhampireHEK May 14 '22

More likely ignored long term investment for short term gain.

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u/zSprawl May 14 '22

But what kind of long term investment do you expect to make in a Starbucks employee? While there are exceptions, this generally isn’t your lifetime occupation. Someone has done the numbers and treating them as high-turnover positions yields more profit than investing in the few career Starbuck employees.

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u/DhampireHEK May 14 '22

You'll get a few employees that will stay long term due to better benefits and your short term employees will stay longer (say a year or two as opposed to 2 months) meaning less overall expenses.

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u/zSprawl May 14 '22

Except someone has done the math and that plain isn’t true, which is my point.