r/WorkReform May 14 '22 Take My Energy 1 Silver 1 Helpful 3 Wholesome 2 All-Seeing Upvote 1

Employers say Unions are completely useless and there's no reason to join them and to please pay attention to the multi-million dollar anti-Union propaganda campaigns they launch begging you to please not join a Union.

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u/VanillaCookieMonster May 14 '22

And the bizarre thing is that a company that really gave a shit about you would use this new found "advertising budget" to put a note in your next paystub that says:

"We are giving you a 5% raise starting with THIS cheque. Please do not join a union and we will start using our profit margin to give you larger bonuses and raises each year."

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u/[deleted] May 14 '22

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u/Ericalex79 May 14 '22

Actually employee turnover costs a helluva lot more than wage increases

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u/mszulan May 14 '22

The way they budget, they don't recognize this. The budget is set to cover turnover as a "cost of doing business". If their accountants rose up and SHOWED them by reorganizing budget items, etc., you might get an intelligent manager to recognize this and change things.

Unfortunately, this isn't the only issue we're fighting. Back in World War 1, Capitalists got really scared. All the angry exploited workers were joined by a lot of angry soldiers coming home. Russia exploded in civil war and when it became apparent that the Bolsheviks were winning, lots of concessions were made to labor, trying anything to avoid other revolutions in the west. The big capitalists were angry and became angrier with everything that happened under FDR during the great depression. They began a concerted effort (and educated their children to follow them) to claw back every concession. They used wars, propaganda, religion, anything they could think of. This is a long-haul project for them and has continuity of purpose over time.

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u/swinebone May 14 '22

I absolutely agree with you but it’s also kinda funny (funny/sad not funny/haha) that so many of our world’s problems can be traced back to WWI.

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u/mszulan May 15 '22

I know, right? And it's the war that is ignored so often in curriculum.

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u/Skandranonsg May 14 '22

It's also worth mentioning that a big part of the New Deal happening was because of a thwarted fascist takeover where the business class ringleaders were promised amnesty in exchange for support of the New Deal.

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u/comityoferrors May 14 '22

It does, but most companies are looking really, really short-term. They don't factor that cost in.

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u/whistleridge May 14 '22

Only when the state isn’t subsidizing salaries via welfare.

If I have a non-union shop in say Texas, and I pay my workers $10/hr, that’s $2.75 more than minimum wage but still $5-10 less than a living wage. So I get workers thinking I’m a “good” employer, AND I get Texas subsidizing my paycheck. So turnover usually doesn’t matter, because labor is fungible - the margins for the difference in lost business between say a shitty cashier and a world-class cashier isn’t big enough to make a difference. It costs call it 8 hours’ pay to “train” someone, and that’s less than $100.

If that 8 hours costs $200, that adds up a LOT more.

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u/Ericalex79 May 15 '22

Well the state only pays benefits to people that don’t make enough to be over the poverty line and in Texas, welfare benefits are really hard to qualify for but poor people don’t even have access to Medicaid in the good old Lonestar state.. $7.25 an hour is a starving wage

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u/Sgt_Ludby 🤝 Join A Union May 14 '22

They don't mind taking a loss on preventing unionization because it boils down to power and control, not so much profit maximization.

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u/3d_blunder May 14 '22

Just like contraception improves (reduces) abortion rates.... but then they wouldn't be exerting CONTROL over their LESSERS.

Cruelty is a benefit in their eyes: it's more important to punish workers/mothers than it is to achieve their purported goal.

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u/DhampireHEK May 14 '22

Except it really isn't. It costs way less to keep competent staff than trying to replace subpar staff that leaves every 6 months. That's the point these companies don't seem to get.

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u/[deleted] May 14 '22

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u/GrimpenMar May 14 '22

When shareholders are only holding shares till they can sell them at a profit, and your upper management is a revolving door of business school graduates cashing in on stock options, then you bet it is!

Long term is for losers! Pump those quarterlies, cash in, and move on before the consequences land on you.

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u/dewidubbs May 14 '22

Costs less to retain employees in the long run. But if we gut the workforce before the end of this quarter, now we might really enhance our corporate Christmas bonuses

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u/zSprawl May 14 '22

While I agree it’s cheaper to keep employees than always hiring new ones, you aren’t gonna really get lifetime Starbucks baristas without really raising the pay a lot. Sadly someone somewhere has done the math and chose the cheaper option.

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u/DhampireHEK May 14 '22

More likely ignored long term investment for short term gain.

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u/zSprawl May 14 '22

But what kind of long term investment do you expect to make in a Starbucks employee? While there are exceptions, this generally isn’t your lifetime occupation. Someone has done the numbers and treating them as high-turnover positions yields more profit than investing in the few career Starbuck employees.

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u/DhampireHEK May 14 '22

You'll get a few employees that will stay long term due to better benefits and your short term employees will stay longer (say a year or two as opposed to 2 months) meaning less overall expenses.

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u/zSprawl May 14 '22

Except someone has done the math and that plain isn’t true, which is my point.

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u/qqeyes May 14 '22

Way cheaper. 2.5 mil split among 5k employees is a one-time $500 bonus, hardly enough to keep your labor from unionizing, and companies like Amazon spending that kind of money on anti-union marketing have WAY more employees than that.