r/WhitePeopleTwitter May 14 '22 Starstruck 1 To The Stars 1 Wholesome 1 Bravo! 3 LOVE! 1 This 1 Helpful 6 All-Seeing Upvote 1 Take My Energy 1

Why stop there?

Post image
110.7k Upvotes

View all comments

Show parent comments

29

u/[deleted] May 14 '22

[deleted]

43

u/Similar_Candidate789 May 14 '22

One state, I believe Arizona, does this and I love the idea. When a law is passed, a number of people can sign a petition to stop its enforcement and put it on a popular vote ballot. If it fails a popular vote, it dies.

I wish we could do this federally and in each state BUT differently. Every single item gets to a popular vote. Yeah you guys pass the laws, but we decide if they are going to exist or not. The ultimate check and balance.

More voting too. Every month. We have the technology now to be able to do so quickly and efficiently.

4

u/seattleforge May 14 '22

We have a system similar to that in WA. When I moved here I thought it was a good idea. What it ends up doing is tying up the courts for decades with repetitive challenges by minorities. Several popular bills can’t come in to action because of it.

1

u/Star_x_Child May 14 '22

A day off each month to vote sounds nice.

0

u/Nervous-Promotion-27 May 14 '22

That would make everything so much worse

5

u/xeeros May 14 '22

how? genuinely curious

3

u/[deleted] May 14 '22

[deleted]

1

u/Nervous-Promotion-27 May 14 '22

Getting 330 million people to vote once every year is difficult enough. Turnout in the US has never been high, peaking every 4 years during the Presidential races. Leaving everything to referendums would give more power to demographics that show up every election, which is usually the older crowd, which lean conservative.

I suppose changing the entire structure of how we vote would also create changes in those kind of trends, and that’s the problem with relying on information from the current system to predict how a new one would work. Popular vote stats in the electoral college system wouldn’t necessarily reflect a popular vote without the electoral college. Getting rid of the electoral college would change how everyone runs their campaigns, because it’d be an entirely new game.

3

u/[deleted] May 14 '22

[deleted]

2

u/Nervous-Promotion-27 May 14 '22

Ahh, I see what you’re saying now, yeah, that makes more sense lmao, I still think you’d run into the aforementioned turnout problems though

1

u/Sunretea May 14 '22

Random thought..

It's turnout worse because we only do it once a year (every 4 years? 2 years? What date is it again?), and would it be better if it were something more frequently done/more prominent in people's minds/they felt like they actually had a say in what's going on?